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Drawing Books

Learn How to Paint Portraits of People In Watercolor For the Absolute Beginners

Learn How to Paint Portraits of People In Watercolor For the Absolute Beginners

TABLE OF CONTENTS
Introduction:
Materials
Color Terms
Primary Colors
Secondary Colors
Tertiary Colors
Hue
Values
Saturation or Chroma
Application and Techniques
How to Use Your Brush
How to Mix Your Watercolor
How to Make a Color Wheel
How to Create Color Value Chart
How to Create a Wash
Rendering the Sphere
Drawing the Outline
Exercises
The Cute Little Baby Boy
The Little Girl in Red
The Lovely Couple
The Old Man
Author Bio
Bonus Content – Drawing a Puppy
Bonus Content – Drawing Landscapes

Our books are available at:

 1. Amazon.com  2. Barnes and Noble  3. Itunes 4. Kobo  5.Smashwords

Introduction:
Learning to Paint Watercolor is easy, and painting portraits using this medium is easier, if you know how and this book is all about it. So first of all I congratulate you for purchasing this eBook. What will you get from this eBook? Let me count the ways: First you will learn how to use your painting brush as if I’m watching you doing your brush strokes, just follow the pictures step-by-step. Next you will be learning to how to mix colors and some fundamentals about the natures of it, and then you will learn Techniques and Tips that will make you confident when painting. Lastly, if you finish all the exercises here, I’m very sure you can paint any portraits that you want to paint it can be your family or relatives, friends, neighbors, and even your love ones. Just give your dedication 100% and time, and you will reap all the benefits. Also don’t forget to take a rest after you finish one exercise, take time to see and correct your work if there is any and have fun it’s a must.

Step by Step instructions to go from photo to finished Portrait Read more…

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Natural Remedy Series

The Magic of Pepper and Peppercorns For Healing and Cooking

The Magic of Pepper and Peppercorns For Healing and Cooking

Table of Contents
Introduction
How Is Black Pepper Grown?
Best Temperature
Harvesting Peppercorns
Other Types of Pepper
White Peppercorns
Peppercorn Oil
Hot Massage Oil
Why Does This Pepper Burn so?
Using Pepper for Tooth Problems
Gingivitis Cure
Sore Throat/Cold Relief
Persistent Cold
Treating Senile Dementia
Throat Soother
Diseases of the Scalp
Keeping Your Tummy Healthy
Tasty Digestive Mix
Pepper in International Cuisine
Indonesian Satay
Using Green Peppercorns in Your Cuisine
Traditional Mulligatawny Soup
Is Pepper Good for Preserving?
Making Coconut Cream at Home
Making Desi Ghee at Home
Conclusion
Author Bio

Our books are available at:

 1. Amazon.com  2. Barnes and Noble  3. Itunes 4. Kobo  5.Smashwords

Introduction
They tell a story about some extremely avid treasure hunters in the Caribbean about 20 years ago.
They managed to get a treasure map about a buried treasure box, buried 400 years ago by some shipwrecked sailors, and with dreams and visions of gold coins and jewels and other precious stones, they began digging at night in all secrecy. In two hours, they struck a box of wood, and they dragged it out. They opened it and plunged their hands in only to find the box full of peppercorns. Those peppercorns had grown moldy, underground, because they had not been dried in the sun. So there were treasure hunters with a moldy smelling sneeze, making powder, which once would have commanded a King’s ransom.

400 years ago, this treasure would have been priceless. Today, like other spices, it is universally available all over the globe and anybody considering pepper priceless, like his ancestors used to do is either living in a remote area with no access to a grocery store or mall or does not know about pepper.
So, for all those people want to know all about why this spice was considered to be the best ransom for kings and emperors, by Roman conquerors, here is a bit about its history.
The pepper is supposed to have originated in the South of India, especially in the Tamil Nadu region where it was called pippali. In ancient times, the ships loaded with peppercorns were collected from areas like Tuticorin, Chettinad , Madurai, the Malabar coast in Kerala and Kanya Kumari (Cape Comorin) and sent all over the globe. Of course, the Romans considered this to be a great addition to their cuisine, and even Pliny the great historian of ancient times made sure that he spoke awarded pepper in his gastronomical delicacies gathered for posterity.
He was dismayed with the fact that India drained the Roman Empire of 50 million sesterces every year with her different spices, of which pepper played a very prominent role. Black pepper, which is commonly called as Millagu in the local Tamil vernacular, was of course an integral part of all the cuisines of this area.
So they tell a tale about a Tamil cook having to feed a hungry British officer. So he mixed up pepper and water, and made mulligan tanni-literally pepper water, which has been immortalized as mulligatawny in Anglo-Indian cuisine.
Pepper was introduced to South Asia somewhere around about 4000 years ago, when it started to be cultivated extensively in Indonesia, Borneo, Java and Sumatra. The word pep comes from adding the missing zing or pepper to your spirit, so when pep talks are peppered with lots of moralizing and lecturing, they can spice up the proceedings really well.
Many of the wars in the medieval times in Europe were caused to gain complete power and access to the trade routes to India. That is why, the Dutch, the Portuguese, and the British kept asking their soldiers and navigators and explorers to look for easier ways to get access to shipping routes to places where they could get spices. It is said that when Vasco da Gama reached Calicuta, the traders asked him what he was looking for. “Christians and spices.” was his answer. He started up the trade route for Portugal to India, but that soon was taken over by the British. Read more…

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Natural Remedy Series

The Magic of Yogurt For Cooking and Beauty

The Magic of Yogurt For Cooking and Beauty

Table of Contents
Introduction
Shopping for Yogurt?
Investing in a Yogurt Maker
How to Make the Perfect Yogurt.
How to Prevent the Yogurt from Getting Watery?
Yogurt in Cuisine
Yogurt – cucumber soup – Tarator
Raita-
Mishti doi (literally sweet yogurt )
Yogurt As Tenderizer
Chicken In Yogurt
Making Whey at Home
Buttermilk or Lassi
How Do You Make Traditional Buttermilk?
Yogurt for Beauty
Yogurt As a Hair Conditioner.
Curing Dandruff
Yogurt As a Facemask.
Rosewater for Beauty
How To Make Rose Water
Conclusion
Author Bio

Our books are available at:

 1. Amazon.com  2. Barnes and Noble  3. Itunes 4. Kobo  5.Smashwords

Introduction
Nobody really knows who first discovered yogurt. Butter is supposed to have been discovered millenniums ago, when camel’s milk was placed in animal skin hides while being transported from one place to another by Arab or Turkish nomads. The ambulatory movement of the camel walking across the desert seem to have a churning effect on the hides, and in the evening, when the milk was taken out of the sack, two new products were discovered. Butter and buttermilk.
This possibly apocryphal serendipity is on par with the supposed discovery of wine. Millenniums ago, a Greek slave was suffering from toothache, and that was so painful that she found an earthenware pitcher full of fermenting grape juice left by some other careless slave. All those bubbles made her think that it was poison, and she would rather drink that, than suffer the pain of a toothache. So she did drink of the juice of the grape and fell asleep. And the miracle of wine was discovered to gladden the hearts of generations. No wonder the Greeks had a God Bacchus – also known as Dionysus and the Roman equivalent Liber to whom you liberally paid libations, before you drank wine – for wine.
But nobody has told us how yogurt was discovered and by whom. But in ancient Indian medicine texts, the mixture of honey with yogurt eaten every day is considered to be the food of the gods to keep you everlastingly healthy.
Along with yogurt, the side products of bacterially fermented milk included buttermilk and butter. Every house proud woman made sure that she kept some yogurt back from yesterday’s batch to prepare today’s batch of yogurt. These cultures have enzymes and bacteria, which are extremely beneficial for your digestive system.
The enzymes produce lactic acid. Lactic acid is what is going to ferment the lukewarm milk. It is also what makes your yogurt sour if you leave it in a warm place after the yogurt has been made. So the moment you see the yogurt set, put it in a cool place. Read more…

Health Benefits of Thyme For Cooking and Health

Health Benefits of Thyme For Cooking and Health

Table of Contents
Getting Started
Chapter # 1: Intro
Chapter # 2: Nutritional Worth
Chapter # 3: Selection and Storage
Chapter # 4: Growing Thyme
Chapter # 5: Species of Thyme
Health Benefits of Thyme
Chapter # 1: Intro
Chapter # 2: Acne
Chapter # 3: Lowers the Risk of Cancer
Chapter # 4: Alleviates High Blood Pressure
Chapter # 5: Food Preservative
Chapter # 6: Treats Bronchitis
Chapter # 7: Kills the Tiger Mosquito
Chapter # 8: Treats Yeast Infections
Conclusion
References

 

 

Our books are available at:

 1. Amazon.com  2. Barnes and Noble  3. Itunes 4. Kobo  5.Smashwords

 

Chapter # 1: Intro
Thyme itself is not a plant or an herb; it is a collective name given to any one of the many flowering shrubs of the Thymus genus. Thyme is a member of the mint family and is a bushy, wood-based shrub with small yet highly fragranced, grayish green leaves followed by bands of pink or purple colored flowers in the early summers; it grows 15 – 30 cm tall and can be 40 cm wide. There are more than 350 different varieties of thyme all over the world, with French thyme or thymus vulgaris and lemon thyme being the most popular ones; further varieties are stated in the next chapters. Although there are a great many numbers of varieties, the general characteristics of each thyme are usually the same and it is only the color and dimensions that varies.In the medical community, the different species of thymes are distinguished by the composition of their essential oils.
Thyme is incredibly versatile and blends seamlessly with almost all kinds of foods, especially in combination with basil, lemon and garlic.Generally, thyme enlightens and brings up the flavor of any dish. This is the reason as to why many of the Italian and French recipes incorporate thyme in their ingredient list. In addition to its culinary benefits, thyme is also used in aromatherapy.
The essential oils of thyme are used in many traditional as well as clinical medicines due to their anti-viral, anti-septic, anti-parasitic, anti-rheumatic and anti-fungal properties. To delve a little deeper, thyme is a very strong detoxifying agent making it an ingredient in many of the detox food items. The herb is an excellent immunity booster, encourages white blood formation and resistance to harmful organisms. Thyme is also very effective against infections, digestive and respiratory to highlight a few. It can be taken as a cure to diarrhea and infections in the vagina (including thrush) & fallopian tubes. Its power as an anti-septic can be understood from the fact that as less as 1% thyme oil can be used to make a solution to treat gum and mouth infections. In addition, thyme is also a used as relaxant due to its soothing effect on the bronchi muscles; it helps to relieve recurring cough, asthma, dry coughs, laryngitis and bronchitis. Last but not the least, thyme being a digestive herb enhances appetite, digestion and stimulation of the liver. This is the extent of the medical properties the introduction will go to; detailed accounts on the medicinal properties of thyme will be given in subsequent sections.
Thyme is considered native to Asia and southern Europe, i.e. Mediterranean basin; it has also been cultivated in Northern America and is known to thrive there as well.
According to the Georgetown University Medical Center, the prevalence of thyme as a medically viable herb can be traced as back as 460 BC when Hippocrates, also known as the father of Western Medicine recognized it and documented its benefits in his work, Hippocratic Corpus. This is why most of the civilizations on the banks of the Mediterranean were prosperous and long-lasting. Some of these include:
The Ancient Egyptians had found use of it and were mummifying the corpses of their pharaohs with it.
The Ancient Greeks used it to burn incense in their temples and in their baths; they believed of it as a source of courage.
Romans used it to purify their rooms and to give aromatic flavoring to alcoholic beverage and cheese.
During the middle. Read more…